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Results for Pesi Fonua

Monday 6 December 2004

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
FROM OUR ARCHIVES December 6, 2004. In this age of globalisation and Free Trade we are told we need to label our precious products. Therefore we should make sure that our "Made in Tonga" stamp sticks as Tongan youth move overseas to pursue their careers. Tonga has to handle its citizenship issue carefully. After years of being relaxed with the dual citizenship issue, why is government now disowning Tongans who have made us proud in the world sporting arena? - Editor's Comment by Pesi Fonua.
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Friday 15 October 2004
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
It is nearly one year since November 2003 when Tongans lost their right to Freedom of Speech as a defence. After last year's Constitutional amendment, Tonga went back 128 years to the days when people were allowed to speak or to express an opinion only if it was in line with that of their superiors or chiefs. Editor's Comment, by Pesi Fonua
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Tuesday 30 December 2003
Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
A new professional organisation of Tongan news media was officially registered in Nuku‘alofa as an incorporated society on 11 November 2003. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 18, no. 3, December 2003.
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Monday 22 September 2003
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
The Tongan Government has launched a nation-wide campaign to counter the growing opposition to its proposed amendment to Clause 7 of the Constitution, which will neutralize "Freedom of Speech" in the Kingdom. -by Pesi Fonua
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Wednesday 3 September 2003
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Although public reaction is heating up to a Tonga government move to control Freedom of Speech by changing Clause 7 of the island kingdom's 127 year old Constitution, few people yet realise the enormous and serious implications of what that change might mean. Objections so far have been based on the glaring illegality of the change, but there is more to it than that. By Pesi Fonua.
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Saturday 30 August 2003

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
During the past few years Tonga has become a Lali of the New Zealand media, and of some fringe New Zealand politicians. A Lali is a drum that is beaten hard with a stick, and in these people’s hands it has meant a thrashing for the Tongan Royalty and the Tongan government. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 18, no. 2, August 2003.
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Saturday 30 August 2003

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
The Tongan way of life is not based in the right of the individual but that of the extended family, the church and the whole country. We have a collective peoples value, and that is where our strength is, and we do not want to give that up, says ‘Alisi Taumoepeau, Tonga’s Solicitor General. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 18, no. 2, August 2003.
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Thursday 20 December 2001

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
When ordinary people reach the age of 64 years they are expected to retire and stop working, but if the King of Tonga, HM King Taufa‘ahau Tupou IV, at 83 years, reduces his work load and looks very tired at the end of an ordinary working day, some people seem to think that something is terribly wrong. The New Zealand media in late October ran a news story that the King’s health was deteriorating, and claimed that there was a battle for power within the Tongan Royal family. Interview by Pesi Fonua, Matangi Tonga Magazine, Vol. 16, no. 3, December 2001.
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Thursday 20 December 2001

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
We found His Majesty, as usual, engrossed in imaginative new ways to bring a healthier economy to Tonga. He firmly believes that the interest by the United Arab Emirates to establish a friendly business relationship with Tonga could be the beginning of a valuable working relationship between the two countries. Meanwhile, the status of the Tonga Trust Fund remains a hot topic. From Matangi Tonga Magazine, Vol. 16, no. 3, December 2001.
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Saturday 30 June 2001

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
A peaceful revolution is currently taking place in Tonga as we are trying to find the right combination to take advantage of what the 21st century has to offer. In business, never before have Tongan business people invested so much money in the Tongan economy, pouring millions of pa‘anga, into trade, telecommunications, tourism, agriculture, fisheries, power generation, the media, shipping, and even airlines. By Pesi Fonua. From Matangi Tonga Magazine, Vol. 16, no. 1, June 2001.
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Saturday 30 September 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
The saying that one can’t see the wood for the trees, is so appropriate to our situation in Tonga today. It has been pointed out numerous times, and we can see it with our own eyes, that we are blessed with a good country, where the weather is hospitable, and the soil is so fertile that plants can grow even in the sand. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 3, September 2000.
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Saturday 30 September 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
While Tonga’s economy is under pressure from the Reserve Bank, because of a steep dive in the Foreign Reserve; and while the Private Sector and the government are preoccupied with far-sighted new projects in telecommunications, power generation and the marketing of Tongan produce overseas—projects that could secure a place for Tonga in the global economy of the 21st century—Parliament, somehow, has been looking inwards, and preoccupying itself with its internal affairs. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 3, September 2000.
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Thursday 1 June 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
While Tongans are being told that their economy is growing at a record pace, at the same time they are faced with the hard reality of the declining value of their currency and the erosion of the foreign reserve. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 2, June 2000.
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Thursday 1 June 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Good governance relies on the notion that those who govern and those who are governed, must be equal participants in the decision-making process. To throw some light on these issues Matangi Tonga interveiwed Dr Feleti Sevele,Tongatapu No. 2 People’s Representative to the Tonga Legislative Assembly, who is a businessman and economist.
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Thursday 1 June 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
FROM OUR ARCHIVES 2000. "It seems to me that the whole approach to life in the Pacific Islands forever sails very closely to what we refer to as ethnicity, which is the way anthropologists and paternalistic aid donors forgive our basic racism....Another example nearer home was the racially motivated and cowardly violence, which young jobless, and dare I say it, hopeless Tongans, visited on our Chinese owned shops last year; an act of such barbarity that it shamed and disgusted me and every other Tongan of my generation...." Crown Prince Tupouto‘a comments in an interview with Pesi Fonua. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 2, June 2000.
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Wednesday 1 December 1999

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Tonga will be the first country in the world to welcome the Year 2000, at the stroke of midnight on December 31, an hour ahead of any one else.
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Thursday 1 July 1999

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
This year government cut its Budget to pay for the retirement and holiday travelling of public servants. It was more important for government to keep the 4,500 public servants happy, than to allocate funds to boost exports and to prop up the value of the pa‘anga. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 14, no. 3, July 1999.
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Monday 31 May 1999

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
The recent funeral of Tonga’s respected former Prime Minister HRH Prince Fatafehi Tu‘ipelehake, brought the country to a standstill for ten days. The occasion, however, reminded us again that Tonga is run by two sets of interwoven political orders, one so old that it has its origins in a mythical heaven, and the other so relatively new that it has not yet replaced the old. By Pesi Fonua. Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 14, no. 2, May 1999.
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Saturday 27 February 1999

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
There's no recovery in sight for Tonga’s continuing economic recession. The major players who could either toss the fish from the frying pan into the fire or onto the dinner table are the Tonga National Reserve Bank, the Treasury, the government ministries and the private sector. And the sooner that these players can function in unity, the sooner Tonga can start to pull ahead. Editor's Comment by Pesi Fonua. Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 14, no. 1, January 1999.
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Sunday 20 December 1998

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
FROM OUR ARCHIVES: The one good thing about impending economic doom is that it offers an opportunity for a serious look at what went wrong and how it can be corrected. By Pesi Fonua. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 13, no. 4, December 1998.
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