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Results for archaeology

Friday 7 February 2020

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
People first arrived in Vava‘u between 850 and 810 BC, establishing themselves on the south central islands offshore of ‘Uta Vava’u. The earliest sites at Ofu, Pangaimotu and Otea are all but identical in their age, and they are coincidental with the oldest sites in Ha’apai. Bird remains aside, excavations of other types of food remains at these sites have an unexpected story to tell: one of scarcity. Fish remains were shockingly limited! Shellfish counts and species diversity are similarly impoverished, illustrating limited productivity, or at least limited sustainability, for reef foraging efforts. By David V. Burley.
Monday 16 December 2019

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Tongatapu was a far different place 3000 years ago, one few of us can imagine today. The sea was higher, almost 1.4 m higher. Much of the land on which the city of Nuku‘alofa now sits was not land at all. It was about 900 BC when voyaging canoes first arrived from a homeland to the west. These kalia carried a small group of people and all of the necessities they would need to settle new found islands. They were the first Tongans. By David Burley
Monday 7 January 2008
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Nukuleka, a small fishing village on the northern shores of eastern Tongatapu, at the entrance to the Fanga'uta Lagoon, has been identified by a Canadian archaeologist, Professor David V. Burley, as the cradle of Polynesia.
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Tuesday 1 June 2004
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Prof. David V. Burley, with 17 students and an assistant from the Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Canada, visiting Tonga in June destined for Vava'u to carry out some excavation work to ascertain the first settlement of Vava'u by ancient Tongans.
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Saturday 30 September 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
The mystery of where the Tongan people came from 3000 years ago, continues to intrigue scholars from around the world. Helping to trace the origin of our ancestors, their way of life, and their migration from Tonga to the rest of Polynesia, a group of Japanese scholars visited Tonga in mid-August in preparation for a two-year research program, which they hoped to start in August 2001. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 3, September 2000.
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