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Thursday 30 July 2009
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Great to see the active interest in energy options for Tonga. With regards to coconuts, it would be terrific if we could find a use for them other than falling on windshields. Unfortunately my analysis shows based on 100 coconuts/tree/year and 100 trees per hectare that it would take 14,000 hectares (70% of Tongatapu) of coconut trees to provide the energy equivalent of 700 hectares of Saafa or Siale Mohe Mohe. Not to mention the difficulty of collecting the coconuts versus mechanized mowing of flat straw/bush pastures. -Peter Goldstern
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Sunday 26 July 2009
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Many thanks to Mr. Peter Goldstern (Solar power...21 July, 2009) for his technical advice, and innovative ideas for renewable energy sources for Tonga's future. -Sione A. Mokofisi
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Tuesday 21 July 2009
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
There are a couple of viable renewable options available for Tonga, one being the burning of Saafa grass to drive steam turbines which could produce cheap electricity as does the burning of 1 million tons of straw each year in Denmark. Burning grass is CO2 neutral because the grass takes the same amount of CO2 out of the air while growing, as is returned to the atmosphere when it is burned. Indeed this option entitles the user to Carbon credits. Saafa could produce electricity for less than the diesel component alone in the current electricity price. -Peter Goldstern
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Thursday 30 April 2009
Auckland, New Zealand
By chance I see it reported in the media this week that Tonga Power will spend 16 million dollars replacing rotten and leaning power poles in a network upgrading programme commencing from the "city". From where I sit, we will have spent these millions only to find that we will remain vulnerable to falling branches as well as hurricane borne damage and still wedded to non-renewable imported and expensive diesel, the price of which is expected to return to stratospheric levels once the world takes the crunch out of credit. In short, not a great deal better. -Sefita Hao'uli
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Friday 24 April 2009
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Tonga is interested in becoming a host country for a regional energy unit, Tonga's Deputy Prime Minister Dr Viliami Tangi told a Pacific Energy Ministers Meeting in Nuku'alofa yesterday.
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Thursday 22 November 2007
Manila, Philippines
The Asian Development Bank ADB and the governments of Japan and Australia are providing $88 million in financing to support the development of Samoa's power sector.
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Sunday 11 February 2007
Mangere, New Zealand
It is very important to accept the fact that Shorelines has made a big different to the reliability of power generation and distribution. We should also understand the fact that we cannot control the oil price and the price of oil has been sky high by more than 200% during the last 2 decades and to be reasonable, the rates of tariff increase is acceptable. -David Tapiaka
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Friday 9 February 2007
UK
Thank you Mr Holiday for selling Shoreline, you are doing a very good job. Perhaps the King and his business partner should hire you to be their PR man. I am beginning to warm to the idea that the company is a good investment. -Senolita Swan
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Thursday 8 February 2007
Mangere, New Zealand
nitially the selling of the ideas of privatizing power generation and power distribution were acceptable and that was from a view that the government must streamline its functions and put more focus on ...“Quality Assurance...”. The Ministry of Lands, Survey and Natural Resources is having the mandate to develop appropriate policies frameworks and legislative in-place for managing power electricity and renewable energy.
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Wednesday 7 February 2007
UK
So, now we know that the King is the owner of Shoreline. Is he the sole owner or in part-ownership of the company? Did the Government pay the $2 million pa'anga bill for Shoreline because the King required it or does the Government still have an obligation to finance this company when it is in financial trouble? - Senolita Swan
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Monday 5 February 2007
London, UK
May I suggest that the Riot on 16/11 is a completely separate issue from "Shoreline". Let us not get confused please. The burning of Tonga on 16/11 was a criminal act. In the civilised world, the Law must be applied to all. I am satisfied that justice will be done in Tonga thanks to the help from the New Zealand Police. The Prime Minister has nothing to do with the arrests of the PR leaders. If the Police found evidence that these PR members committed offences in connection with 16/11 then they must be dealt with according to the Law of the Land. Amen.
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Sunday 4 February 2007
Texas, USA
Mr. Kava slammed the people's representatives for selling or allowing the sale of the former Tonga Power Board to Shoreline. There are two issues here that I would like to find the truth and I am very confident that someone out there who knows the paliament records which hold the real true (answers) to these accusations: - v
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Friday 2 February 2007
Pago Pago, American Samoa
Power production was sold to the Shoreline only after the approval of the Parliament. It included the concurrences of all the People's Representative. Before visiting the issue at hand, it is appropriate and proper to interview my representative in the parliament who voted yes to the sales of the power producing authority and responsibility to Shoreline. I, being from Tongatapu would like my representative at the parliament, Mr. Pohiva, Mr. Pulu and Mr. Edwards to explain the reasons why they agreed on the sale. -Sione L. Kava
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Thursday 1 February 2007
New South Wales, Australia
The point is that in every action that the Government of Tonga takes it must be accountable and transparent. If it is not ...– this mere shortfall alone will inhibit the rebuilding of our beloved country and society. -Viliami Lakasi
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Thursday 1 February 2007
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Mr. Viliami Lakasi questions the validity, and the "repayment terms" of the Government loan to Shoreline in his letter (Jan. 31, 2007). Perhaps in good times Mr. Lakasi's inquiry could be viewed with interest. But in view of what happened on November, 16, 2006, I would say Mr. Lakasi is on the insensitive side. - Sione Ake Mokofisi
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Wednesday 31 January 2007
New South Wales, Australia
I read with interest the letter recently published by the Director of the Tonga Electric Power Board and the Minister for Transport. As a tax payer can I please ask what are the terms of this 'loan'? - Viliami Lakasi
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Friday 26 January 2007
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
The Tongan government injected $2 million into the Shoreline Power company to pay its fuel bills and prop it up following the destruction of its head office in the November 16 riots, it was revealed today. The government will now have to raise an estimated $60 million to buy back its power generation facility from Shoreline Power. By Pesi Fonua.
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Friday 3 November 2006
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Shoreline Power, Tonga's sole power generator signed a "Preliminary Sale Agreement" with Northpower of Whangarei, New Zealand, on October 31, Soane Ramanlal, the Chief Executive Officer for the Shoreline Group of Companies announced this afternoon in Nuku'alofa.
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Tuesday 5 September 2006
Auckland, New Zealand
The argument in Parliament at present centres around the size of the electricity price hike - which is the short-term issue. But alongside should be a more sustained discussion on the long-term solution to power supply. Tonga is not on its own on this issue as many countries are just as vulnerable as we are. But it's time like this that size does matter and for once - small is beautiful. Oil is a non-renewable source and as it dwindles at source, the price will continue to climb. There are alternatives abound which we should now consider seriously.
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Monday 4 September 2006
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
The Tonga Electric Power Board today, announced a 5.21 seniti increase in the price of electricity that by the end of the year could translate into a 35.6% increase for domestic consumers.
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