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Thursday 30 May 2002

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Tonga’s Chief Secretary and the Secretary for Cabinet, Mrs ‘Eseta Fusitu‘a, dismissed the USA Department of State report as having been doctored, not factual and incomplete. “A report of this nature, I am sure, is used as a reference by international organisations, but we have never been asked to comment.” From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 17, no. 1, May 2002.
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Thursday 30 May 2002

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Tonga’s Prime Minister announced on February 14 that there was a serious turn in Tonga’s relationship with New Zealand in the wake of unsubstantiated accusations made by New Zealand’s foreign ministry. The Prime Minister Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata believed that a New Zealand Ministerial attack which ridiculed the Tongan government and Tonga’s Royal family was an attempt to influence Tonga’s March General Election, and “to take the moral high ground, to say they are holier than us, and to dictate to other countries what New Zealand wants”. Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata was responding to the accusations at a press conference he called in Nuku‘alofa. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 17, no. 1, May 2002.
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Thursday 30 May 2002

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Tongans responded with shock and outrage after the New Zealand Foreign Ministry publicly accused the Tongan government of corruption, expressing concern about the state of democracy in the country and saying that the Tongan government appeared reluctant to introduce constitutional changes. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 17, no. 1, May 2002.
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Thursday 30 May 2002

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Tongan Prime Minister, Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata in early May commented on the reforms facing Tonga. Interview By Pesi Fonua. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 17, no. 1, May 2002.
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Thursday 30 May 2002

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Lopeti Senituli, the full time Director of the Tonga Human Rights and Democracy Movement says that his organisation wants to change Tonga’s structure of government, first with a mass movement and then later by introducing political parties. Interview by Pesi Fonua. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 17, no. 1, May 2002.
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Saturday 30 September 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Hon. Veikune, the Speaker of the Tongan Legislative Assembly, first entered Parliament in 1975 as one of two Noble’s representatives for Vava‘u. During his 22 years in the House, Hon. Veikune has served as Chairman of the Whole House Committee, and last year was appointed by the King as the new Speaker. Recently he has taken part in a regional seminar on Parliamentary democracy, and here comments on the stability of the Tongan parliamentary system, as seen from the nobility’s viewpoint. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 3, September 2000.
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Saturday 30 September 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Lopeti Senituli, the former Director of the Pacific Concerns Resource Centre, took over as the new Director of the Tonga Human Rights and Democracy Movement in July. - Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 3, September 2000.
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Thursday 1 June 2000

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
It was success at last for Koliniasi Afuha’amango (72), the newly elected Vava’u People’s Representative to the Tongan Legislative Assembly, taking over from William Harris, the Vava’u No. One People’s Representative who died last year. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 2, June 2000.
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Thursday 1 June 2000

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
‘Eseta Fusitu‘a, a key government spokesperson on Tongan affairs denies a claim that there is no accountability in the Tongan political system. She says that Tongans must find their own way and not be herded into accepting a foreign system. ‘Eseta is Deputy Chief Secretary and Deputy Secretary to Cabinet, and heads the Government Information Unit. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 2, June 2000.
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Monday 20 March 2000

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
(From our archives, March 2000). Millennium interview with Baron Vaea. When King Taufa‘ahau Tupou IV finally accepted the resignation of Tonga’s 78-year-old Prime Minister, Hon. Baron Vaea, on December 3, 1999, it ended another intriguing saga of Tongan politics. Strange as it may sound, this was the case of a Prime Minister who had wanted to retire and go home after serving five decades in the public service—but he was not allowed to. When he finally agreed to our interview, on January 11, it was obvious why this overworked man had insisted on retirement. Baron Vaea was one exhausted person.
Monday 20 March 2000

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
Minister of Police, Clive Edwards said he was concerned about reports that New Zealand was going to fund Tonga’s Pro Democracy and Human Rights Movement, and he believed that it would interfere with Tonga’s political stability. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 15, no. 1, March 2000.
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Monday 31 May 1999

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
‘Akilisi Pohiva has been a controversial political figure ever since he first entered Parliament in 1987, not only because of his indifference to the rules and procedures of the House, but also for his outspoken and controversial comments about Cabinet ministers, the King and members of the Royal family. They are comments that have cost him tens of thousands of pa‘anga in lawyers’ fees and court awards for the defamed over the last decade. Interview and photos by Pesi Fonua. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 14, no. 2, May 1999.
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Monday 31 May 1999

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
The Tonga Pro-Democracy Movement has changed its name. In the process of changing its image from that of a political organisation to become a Non-Government Organisation, it is now called the Tonga Human Rights and Democracy Movement. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 14, no. 2, May 1999.
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Saturday 27 February 1999

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
From our archives: Matangi Tonga asks parliamentary candidates for the March 1999 General Election: How can the Tongan economy recover? How can more youth be employed? There are a diversity of views. Standing People’s Representative for Tongatapu, 'Akilisi Pohiva said to ask the Ministers who had the authority.
Saturday 27 February 1999

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
What difference would it make to the 1999 Tongan Parliamentary Election on March 11 if the estimated 25,000 eligible Tongan voters overseas were allowed to vote? By Pesi Fonua. Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 14, no. 1, January 1999.
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Monday 1 December 1997

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
While their political views may differ widely, the one thing that most people agree on is that Tonga as a nation is a special case. ...While Tonga enjoys a certain status among nations under a constitutional monarchy form of government, any move to replace it with an elected form of government will be a step into the unknown. Matangi Tonga looks at what different people in the community have to say about their current system of government. FROM OUR ARCHIVES, by Pesi Fonua.

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