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Results for Tongan Constitution

Friday 15 July 2016
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
When talking about the Separation of Church and State, we need to be reminded of the different historical, political, and social contexts in which this principle was being defined, perceived, and rehashed. – Senituli Penitani.
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Thursday 6 November 2014
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Tongans had a day-off on Monday, November 3 as the Kingdom observed a national holiday celebrating its 139 year-old Constitution - the second oldest in the Southern Hemisphere.
Thursday 24 October 2013
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Tonga's parliament has rejected a Private Member's Bill that sought to change how Tongans elect a Prime Minister and proposing that a care-taker government run government when parliament closes at the end of the month, in preparation for the Parliamentary General Election in November next year. The bill presented by 'Aisake Eke's was rejected by the House this afternoon with a vote of 15-6. From the House, by Pesi Fonua.
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Monday 21 October 2013
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
A Bill to dissolve government when parliament closes in a few days times, and a caretaker government to take over in preparation for the Parliamentary Election in November 2014, was introduced into the Tongan parliament this afternoon, 21 September. From the House, by Pesi Fonua.
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Sunday 9 June 2013
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Tonga needs more time to allow its two-year-old democracy to flourish, HM King Tupou VI told the Tonga Legislative Assembly in a message on June 7.
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Friday 14 May 2010
Salt Lake City-Utah, USA
Mr Senituli Penitani throws in the "abortion" issue to the discussion of judiciary independence hoping to "muddy the water". Reminding Mr. Penitani that I never stated a preference for the American System of justice. I wrote that whichever system Tonga selects (Westminster: British, NZ, etc. American, or Australia: hybrid American-Westminster), they all share a common respect for the "independence" of the Judiciary. - Sione Akemeihakau Mokofisi.
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Sunday 9 May 2010
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Whichever system Tonga's transformational government adopts, the independence of a Judiciary Branch is paramount in establishing people's respect and trust in such a government. An Absolute Monarch rules an oligarchy that denies the full democratic benefits of egalitarianism in a society. - Sione Akemeihakau Mokofisi.
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Tuesday 4 May 2010
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Mr Lopeti Senituli must know that the present system of which he speaks (The King appoints the judges . . . 03 May 2010) makes King George Tupou V an "Absolute Monarch" instead of Tonga being a "Constitutional Monarchy." Inquiring minds are asking: With the King appointing judges, doesn't it subject the Judiciary to the will of the King and Cabinet? With due respect, Mr. Senituli knows very well that the days of the status quo are numbered - six months. This is why the "democratic transformation" is taking place: to follow the mandate of the Constitution. - Sione Akemeihakau Mokofisi.
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Friday 20 January 2006
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Political reformers who demanded response from the King of Tonga to a petition proposing amendments to the Tongan Constitution, say their January 16 deadline has passed without any word from the king.
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Friday 4 November 2005
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
On today's public holiday to mark the 130th year of the Tongan Constitution, a political rally of about 200 people at Pangai Si'i in Nuku'alofa was told that the constitution deprives them of fundamental rights.
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Wednesday 19 October 2005
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
After two days of camping at Pangai Si'’i in central Nuku'alofa, without receiving a response from Cabinet, Tonga's Constitutional change campaigner, Laki Niu, stepped up his call for democratic changes to the Tongan Constitution today by marching with 30 supporters to the parliament house.
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Thursday 19 May 2005
USA
After reading the "Tongan Constitution", I cannot hold myself back from speculating on the state of affairs of our kingdom. A few things are now becoming clear from that reading.
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Tuesday 31 August 2004
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Day two of the Constitutional Judicial Review proceeded with the legal counsel for the Plaintiffs, Dr Rodney Harrison making his submission, setting out facts to support his claim that the amendment of Clause 7 of the Constitution and the introduction of restrictive media legislation last year was unconstitutional.
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Wednesday 23 June 2004
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
In light of the Government’’s success in adding "the cultural traditions of the Kingdom,"as a new conditionality on the freedom of speech and expression in Tonga, one can be forgiven for jumping to the conclusion that perhaps the Government wants the media and the Tongan people in general to revert to pre-Constitution Tongan standards in which back-chatting the chiefs was punishable by a serious flogging if not death. By Lopeti Senituli.
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Tuesday 30 December 2003

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
How they voted in the House, the 16 members who voted to curb free speech were: Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata, James Cecil Cocker, William Clive Edwards, Dr Masasso T. Paunga, Dr Viliami Ta‘u Tangi, Hon. Fielakepa, Siosiua Tupou ‘Utoikamanu, ‘Aisea Havea Taumoepeau, Paula Sunia Bloomfield, Hon. Tuita, Hon. Malupo, Hon. ‘Akau‘ola, Hon. Fohe, Hon. Nuku, Hon. Havea Tu‘iha‘angana, and Hon. Tu‘i‘afitu. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 18, no. 3, December 2003.
Monday 1 December 2003
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
The reason why the Tongan Government decided to enact Media Bills and to amend Clause 7 of the Constitution so that they can control the local Media, remains a mystery. One thing that is clear, however, is that the new media legislation is vindictive, because it is meant to hurt. - Matangi Tonga, Vol. 18, No. 3
Wednesday 3 September 2003
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Although public reaction is heating up to a Tonga government move to control Freedom of Speech by changing Clause 7 of the island kingdom's 127 year old Constitution, few people yet realise the enormous and serious implications of what that change might mean. Objections so far have been based on the glaring illegality of the change, but there is more to it than that. By Pesi Fonua.
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Saturday 30 August 2003

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
When the Tonga government’s ban on the Taimi ‘o Tonga newspaper came unstuck in March, it proceeded to draft bills to amend the Constitution and to introduce new legislation to try to regulate the media. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 18, no. 2, August 2003.
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Law
Friday 1 August 2003
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
The proposed amendment to the Tongan Constitution Clause 7- Freedom of Speech would replace the existing Clause 7 if government succeeds in passing it through the Legislature. -Matangi Tonga, Vol. 18, No. 2
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Tuesday 4 November 1997
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
“Let this day, November 4, be a day of rejoicing and commemoration for the people of Tonga forever..." From Matangi Tonga magazine, Vol. 12, no. 4, October-December 1997