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Results for Opinion

Sunday 17 September 2017

Dhaka, Bangladesh
Myanmar is in crisis. The Rohingya – a Muslim ethnic minority group in a predominantly Buddhist country – are under attack by the military, with many fleeing for their lives. This escalating conflict is threatening to undermine Myanmar’s ongoing democratic transition – and to tarnish irrevocably the reputation of the country’s de facto leader, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. By Syed Munir Khasru.
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Thursday 14 September 2017

New York, USA
“Leadership,” in this case, doesn’t necessarily mean an individual positioned at the top of a government or business hierarchy. Rather, it is defined by actions aimed at improving a community’s wellbeing, and it can come from anyone. We have seen firsthand how the presence of a diverse set of engaged leaders at all levels – educators, parents, students, policymakers, advocates, and others – can make or break efforts by a community or country to maximize opportunities to improve its education system. By Wendy Kopp and Dzingai Mutumbuka
Saturday 9 September 2017

New Delhi, India
With every new crisis that the world faces, humanity’s differences appear increasingly intractable. Religion, ethnicity, history, politics, and economics have all become tools to denigrate and demean. People seem to be drifting apart, and no country is immune from divisive discourse. But there is one fundamental issue where contrasts dissolve into consensus: the desire to keep children safe. By Kailash Satyarthi.
Tuesday 5 September 2017

Cambridge, USA
The United States and China have reached a precarious moment in their relationship. Ensuring a peaceful outcome will be the greatest geopolitical challenge of the twenty-first century. Are our leaders up to it? By Graham Allison and Arianna Huffington.
Sunday 3 September 2017
Sene, 'Aositelelia
Fakamalo atu ki he ‘Ateni Seniale he fakamahino ki he tukunga ‘o e tu’utu’uni kuo hifo mei he’ene ‘Afio fekau’aki mo e Palemia, mo e kau Minisita ‘o e Kapineti pea pehe ki he Pule’anga fakakatoa.
Sunday 3 September 2017
Parliament House

Nuku'alofa, Tonga
The dissolution of the Tongan Parliament by HM King Tupou VI on August 24 is a wake up call for Tongans to return their focus to Tonga's modern democratisation process. Since a move to speed up the democratic reform process was initiated in 2010, social and political progress has faltered in an increasingly unsettled and disruptive political environment. By Pesi Fonua
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Wednesday 16 August 2017

Santa Monica, USA
As global temperatures rise and droughts become more common, political agitation, social unrest, and even violence will likely follow. Scientists agree that climate change poses a grave danger to the planet. But for some reason, politicians and government officials have not connected the dots between a changing climate and human conflicts. Among the many threats associated with climate change, deteriorating global security may be the most frightening of all. It is bad enough to see farmers carrying skulls through the streets of India. But if we do not get serious about climate-driven security risks, we could see far worse. By Gulrez Shah Azhar
Tuesday 15 August 2017

Cambridge-MA, USA
As North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un and US President Donald Trump’s war of words escalates, Independence Day celebrations – commemorating the Korean Peninsula’s 1945 liberation from Japanese colonial rule – are unfolding in both North and South Korea. The occasion underscores not just the shared history between the two countries, but also the South’s unique qualifications to bring about a peaceful resolution to the current military standoff. ...With saber-rattling between North Korea and the US at an all-time high, the [US-South Korea UFG] military exercise – which will begin on August 21 – could escalate the conflict dramatically. By Katharine H.S. Moon.
Wednesday 9 August 2017

Istanbul, Turkey
Over the next few months, the 12,000 employees based at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California will complete their move to an extravagant new campus. The “spaceship,” covering 2.8 million square feet, includes a two-story yoga studio, running paths, and even revolutionary pizza boxes that keep slices crisp. One thing it does not have, however, is daycare. By Bharati Sadasivam
Monday 7 August 2017

Milan, Italy
National and international institutional frameworks must continue to guard against destructive actions by political leaders. In the final analysis, confidence in these institutions’ resilience – and in an eventual end to the current political dysfunction – is what markets seem to be banking on. by Michael Spence.
Thursday 3 August 2017

Los Angeles, USA
Despite the falsehoods that some politicians peddle, facts still matter, and getting those facts right is essential for survival. I know, because I regularly see the deadly consequences of getting facts wrong. ... When we glibly dismiss fact-checked articles in reputable news sources as “fake news,” we fail to use evidence to support our conclusions. In politics as in science, when we dismiss revealed truth, we increase the likelihood of catastrophically bad outcomes. By Daniel T. Blumstein.
Sunday 30 July 2017

New York, USA
Giving girls the skills and knowledge they need to become productive individuals who can participate in the twenty-first-century economy empowers them in all aspects of their lives, enabling them to contribute to their families, communities, and economies in ways they choose. It is the right thing to do for global development – and for girls and women themselves. But ... empowering girls to use their energies and talents to transform their societies will not be easy. By Thoai Ngo.
Wednesday 26 July 2017

Stanford, USA
When a tortoise is sitting on a post, you know it didn’t get there by itself. The reappearance of the same four arguments developed a quarter-century ago by an industry that benefits from delaying climate policies – arguments used with great success precisely because their origin and true purpose were hidden from the public – looks a lot like the tortoise’s four wiggling feet. The same arguments – and people – used by the fossil fuel industry to block climate policies decades ago are back. By Benjamin Franta.
Wednesday 19 July 2017

Liverpool, United Kingdom
Science fiction has long explored the terrifying possibility that we are devoid of free will, and that some unpleasant creature could control our minds or turn us into plodding zombies. But mind control is not just a literary trope. It is also a common method by which parasites gain access to environments where they can grow, reproduce, and complete their life cycles. By Robbie Rae.
Monday 17 July 2017

Princeton, USA
When Americans are asked what percentage of US government spending goes to foreign aid, the median answer is 25%. The correct answer is 1%. No wonder, then, that when President Donald Trump justifies cutting aid on the grounds that other countries need to step up because they are not paying their fair share, many people believe him. By Peter Singer.
Saturday 15 July 2017

Oxford, United Kingdom
In recent years, the world has become increasingly preoccupied with the catastrophic potential of global warming and other human-induced environmental changes, and rightly so. But one of the most serious risks has been all but ignored: the threat to human health. ...Determined opponents will question the science and criticize those who claim that human health is being jeopardized by environmental disregard. But to these critics I pose a question of my own: “Are you willing to risk being wrong?" By Shaukat Aziz.
Monday 10 July 2017

Brussels, Belgium
Under President Donald Trump’s leadership, the United States took another major step toward establishing itself as a rogue state on June 1, when it withdrew from the Paris climate agreement. For years, Trump has indulged the strange conspiracy theory that, as he put it in 2012, “The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive.” But this was not the reason Trump advanced for withdrawing the US from the Paris accord. Rather, the agreement, he alleged, was bad for the US and implicitly unfair to it. - Joseph E. Stiglitz.
Monday 26 June 2017
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Regretfully, I must intrude into your day, and reluctantly make a further comment on the sad saga that is the 2019 Pacific Games (PG2019).
2 comments
Thursday 15 June 2017
Auckland, New Zealand
Please Prime Minister Pohiva, think again and do not harden your heart, because you are making a mockery of our Parliamentary system...you have Tongans and friends of Tonga with the archeological, cultural, environmental and engineering expertise and the hearts and minds to build our nation, please Prime Minister use them. You are destroying our environment and in the process destroying our very fragile “democracy” and our trust in you and this Government. -‘Ana Hau‘alofa‘ia Koloto
Monday 12 June 2017
Washington, USA
I cannot over emphasize the potential gravity of development in and around the reclaimed Popua landfill. I recommended this area not be used for a landfill from its onset in the 1980's. I can't say how extremely disturbed I was to see the area around it now being developed as a children's park that I was told was being funded as a Chinese gift. Richard Stoll, environmental engineer.

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