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Results for Betty Blake

Law
Friday 6 September 2013
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Tonga’s landmark Family Protection Bill 2013 passed by the Legislative Assembly of Tonga on September 4, after three weeks of heavy debate, will help the police to deal with family violence that is increasing in Tonga. It now awaits the assent of the King and is expected to be enacted next year.
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Wednesday 7 August 2013
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
A Tongan social services provider, the Ma‘a Fafine mo e Famili, has won funding support to continue its caregiving to the elderly and disabled children for another year.
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Friday 17 August 2012
Nuku'alofa, Tonga
Assigning caregivers to visit homes of the most vulnerable elderly people in Tongatapu and Lifuka in Ha'apai, and to care for them for a few hours each day, is an essential service that will be provided under Tonga's first Social Services Pilot program for the elderly.
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Monday 1 December 2003
Nuku'‘alofa, Tonga
Reaching out to Tongan women to explain their rights, and to help eliminate discrimination against them, is the aim of a newly formed women'’s working group. -Matangi Tonga, Vol. 18, No. 3
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Saturday 30 August 2003

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
A Centre for Women and Children that was started by the Catholic Women’s League in Nuku‘alofa, has became a National Project of Tonga, in order to survive and to grow, the CWL Annual General Meeting was told in April. From Matangi Tonga Magazine Vol. 18, no. 2, August 2003.
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Tuesday 30 January 2001

Nuku‘alofa, Tonga
FROM OUR ARCHIVES: There was no looking back for Betty Blake after she accepted a challenge to help the women and children in Tonga who were being treated badly. Betty, who has been working extensively with women in the villages throughout Tonga since 1996, is sure that the first step for women to gain equality is for women to know their rights. “About 95% of the women who filled the questionnaire did not know their rights. They assumed that once they were married their husband owned everything they had, and therefore they had to be obedient, they believed ‘it is alright if he beats me because I am his wife’.” Most of the women she was dealing with had been conditioned to think this way and it was very difficult for them to break out of it. Interview from Matangi Tonga Magazine, Vol. 15, no. 4, January 2001.
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