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16-11

I promise

Pago Pago, American Samoa

Editor,

Please extend this courtesy response to Mr. Holani.

Before anything else, I’ll pay my respects to the real Holani family and friends of Kolomotu’a I grew up with and address you as Joe.

First, Joe, please, do not insult my intelligence and my honor by apologizing for me and what I said. I meant every word I say. I did not need to be “mafana” as you put it. You and your Demos, have to be drunk “mafana” to be able to do what you did at Nuku’alofa.

Second, people with small minds only see the damages to a property. Fineanganofo, another sad excuse for a Kolomotu’a, commented that it is only lumbers to be easily replaced. A geographical grid coordinated with nothing but an old building and a couple of old coconut trees may be nothing to you, but when the same location is referred to as home, it means and is worth much more. Nuku’alofa, even before you guys changed it on 16/11, does not resemble the one we used to have back in the 1970’s. Nevertheless, it is the memories of the place, a sanctuary, that makes the place special. It is a deculturalized zone that everyone can say is his or hers. It is the meeting place where everyone of us seems to be on a level playing field. You move east of the Taufa’ahau Road and the boys from Fasi and Kolofo’ou will let you know that you are trespassing, and of course, should you drift west, the sons and daughters of Kolomotu’a will flex their muscles.

Third: if the Faifekau’s role does not include controlling his congregation from acting out in violence, then they are of very little worth to us. I find it hard to believe that a Faifekau who marches with the enemy, eats and drinks with the enemy, and also offers prayers for my enemy is not an enemy. The saying goes, if he walks like a duck, quacks like a duck and hangs around with ducks then he must be a duck.

Fourth: I can’t help if you got that inferiority complex disease. I don’t show off. I rely on my own experiences to help explain my points across. The issue again is like you slapped me in the face and ran only to return later saying let’s forget the past. If you are seeking some sort of forgiveness from me I would at least expect you to say, I am sorry and I am willing to help pay for the damages. As of today, as far as I know, none of the Demos has done that.

Last, I must thank you for the invitation to visit you. I’ll take you up on that offer. Unfortunately, I will not be able to tell you when. But you will know when. This is not a threat. It is a promise.

Desert WarLord

Mafi ‘o Amerika Samoa

Sione L. Kava

slkava [at] samoatelco [dot] com